Soft moss a downy pillow makes, and green leaves spread a tent,
Where Faerie fold may rest and sleep until their night is spent.
The bluebird sings a lullaby, the firefly gives a light,
The twinkling stars are candles bright, Sleep, Faeries all, Good Night.
~Elizabeth T. Dillingham, “A Faery Song”

image: a Katrin Arens concept design <3

Soft moss a downy pillow makes, and green leaves spread a tent,

Where Faerie fold may rest and sleep until their night is spent.

The bluebird sings a lullaby, the firefly gives a light,

The twinkling stars are candles bright, Sleep, Faeries all, Good Night.

~Elizabeth T. Dillingham, “A Faery Song”

image: a Katrin Arens concept design <3

 
Have a restful evening, fae friends

Have a restful evening, fae friends

When the winds of March are wakening the crocuses and crickets,
Did you ever find a fairy near some budding little thickets,&#8230;
And when she sees you creeping up to get a closer peek
She tumbles through the daffodils, a playing hide and seek.
~Marjorie Barrows

When the winds of March are wakening the crocuses and crickets,

Did you ever find a fairy near some budding little thickets,…

And when she sees you creeping up to get a closer peek

She tumbles through the daffodils, a playing hide and seek.

~Marjorie Barrows

thesecretgoldf1sh:

I made a mermaid! I love mermaids.
My second animation in AfterEffects.

thesecretgoldf1sh:

I made a mermaid! I love mermaids.

My second animation in AfterEffects.

Kiss by ~russhorseman on deviantART

Kiss by ~russhorseman on deviantART

"Fairies are invisible and inaudible like angels.  But their magic sparkles in nature."  ~Lynn Holland

The fairies of Spring are winging their way here even now 

"Fairies are invisible and inaudible like angels.  But their magic sparkles in nature."  ~Lynn Holland

The fairies of Spring are winging their way here even now 

Have a dreamy night, fae friends

Have a dreamy night, fae friends

 

Dusk, Santorini, Greece
photo via theworld

 

Dusk, Santorini, Greece

photo via theworld

 

Cary Grant in My Favorite Wife, 1940

 

Brigitte Bardot photographed by Burt Glinn, 1958.

 

Brigitte Bardot photographed by Burt Glinn, 1958.

 

Seventeen, January 1961

 

Seventeen, January 1961

Fingal&#8217;s Cave is a sea cave on the uninhabited island of Staffa, in the Inner Hebrides of Scotland, part of a National Nature Reserve owned by the National Trust for Scotland. It became known as Fingal&#8217;s Cave after the eponymous hero of an epic poem by 18th-century Scots poet-historian James Macpherson. Its size and naturally arched roof, and the eerie sounds produced by the echoes of waves, give it the atmosphere of a natural cathedral. The cave&#8217;s Gaelic name, An Uaimh Bhinn, means &#8220;the melodious cave.&#8221; 
Romantic composer Felix Mendelssohn visited in 1829 and wrote an overture, The Hebrides, Op. 26, (also known as Fingal&#8217;s Cave overture), inspired by the weird echoes in the cave. Mendelssohn&#8217;s overture popularized the cave as a tourist destination. Other famous 19th-century visitors included author Jules Verne who used it in his book Le Rayon vert (The Green Ray); poets William Wordsworth, John Keats, and Alfred, Lord Tennyson; and Romantic artist J. M. W. Turner, who painted &#8220;Staffa, Fingal&#8217;s Cave&#8221; in 1832. Queen Victoria also made the trip.
[source: Wikipedia]

Fingal’s Cave is a sea cave on the uninhabited island of Staffa, in the Inner Hebrides of Scotland, part of a National Nature Reserve owned by the National Trust for Scotland. It became known as Fingal’s Cave after the eponymous hero of an epic poem by 18th-century Scots poet-historian James Macpherson. Its size and naturally arched roof, and the eerie sounds produced by the echoes of waves, give it the atmosphere of a natural cathedral. The cave’s Gaelic name, An Uaimh Bhinn, means “the melodious cave.” 

Romantic composer Felix Mendelssohn visited in 1829 and wrote an overture, The Hebrides, Op. 26, (also known as Fingal’s Cave overture), inspired by the weird echoes in the cave. Mendelssohn’s overture popularized the cave as a tourist destination. Other famous 19th-century visitors included author Jules Verne who used it in his book Le Rayon vert (The Green Ray); poets William Wordsworth, John Keats, and Alfred, Lord Tennyson; and Romantic artist J. M. W. Turner, who painted “Staffa, Fingal’s Cave” in 1832. Queen Victoria also made the trip.

[source: Wikipedia]

Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest
Google+
Youtube